4 Innovative Uses Of Podcasting

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If you look around the podcasting landscape it’s easy to see certain themes pop up in terms of what is being talked about. A look into the types of podcasts most frequently showing up in the iTunes charts include:

  • True Crime

  • Interviews

  • Comedy

  • Daily News

However, as we’ve previously discussed, charting in iTunes isn’t, and shouldn’t be, the sole goal of a podcast. Across the industry innovative uses of podcasts are popping up and not necessarily with the goal of getting the largest audience possible.

Let’s take a look at some of the unique ways podcasters are connecting and building relationships with their audiences.

Education

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The journal of the American Medical Association currently produces over 20 podcasts. The JAMA Network covers a range of topics from Pediatrics to Dermatology to Cardiology. The JAMA network even has a custom-built iOS app, JN Listen, that allows its members to earn CME credits by listening to peer-reviewed articles and then completing a short quiz within the app.

Dr. Ed Livingston, Deputy Editor for Clinical Reviews and Education, broke down why the JAMA has invested heavily in audio on this episode of the Tech Done Right podcast with Noel Rappin, previous From The Beginning guest.

Chambers of Commerce

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Andersonville is a vibrant neighborhood on Chicago’s north side. With long-standing Swedish roots, it has become the “shop local capital of Chicago”. As part of that those roots, the local Chamber of Commerce has created a campaign to promote shopping local called Always Andersonville. As part of that campaign, in March of 2018, they launched a podcast highlighting the local organizations and businesses that participate in Always Andersonville. Each episode interviews a local business owner about their background, goals and why they chose Andersonville for their business. The goal is to highlight the tight-knit community and businesses in the neighborhood. The Chamber of Commerce is also very active on social media.

Internal Corporate Training / Communication

The publicly available podcasts you find on iTunes, Spotify and Google are examples of what are called “open” podcasts. There’s another type of podcast, called “closed” podcasts, that’s rising in popularity. Closed podcasts are private podcasts that are meant for limited distribution.

One of the fastest uses for closed podcasts is corporate communication and training. Media consumption habits are changing rapidly, especially among younger workers. Employees are also more likely not to be working solely at a desk and, those that are, are often are listening to audio. As such, reaching them through more mobile means, and with alternatives to the standard corporate email, is needed if you’re going to engage them.

Limitless Minds is an organization that offers customized training and consulting for leadership development inside organizations. One of the ways they deliver that training to their clients is through closed podcasts, creating custom training and leadership content aimed at employees to help learning, sales and mindset development.

Local Metro

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Related to the chamber of commerce example above, another local civic organization using podcasts is the King County Metro through their podcast “Unmute the Commute”. Unmute the Commute highlights and explores the many stories and commuters throughout their daily migration. Publishing since 2014, Unmute the Commute has highlighted local legislation, benefits, and trends of using public transport as well as the impact public transportation can have on the surrounding community.

Think about the quality of your reach not just quantity

From education to civic engagement to local commerce, podcasting is a way to reach your audience in a unique and interesting way to create a meaningful connection. Using audio to elevate and surface stories offer an authentic and intimate way to engage your community or company in an effort to foster relationships with them.

Griffin CaprioSTRATEGY